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"Club Drugs/Date Rape Drugs"
Analysis and Information, Continued

Rohypnol (Flunitrazepam)

Rohypnol (flunitrazepam) is a strong sedative which is manufactured and distributed by Hoffman-La Roche. A member of the benzodiazepine family which includes drugs such as Librium, Xanax, and Valium, Rohypnol is about ten times the strength of Valium. Typically, Rohypnol is smuggled into Texas from the Mexican pharmacias; supplies in Florida come from Latin America. Street prices in Texas range from $1 to $5 per pill. Slang terms for Rohypnol include Roach, Roche (ro-shay), Roofies, Run-Trip-and-Fall, R-2, Mexican Valium, Ropynol, Rib, and Rope. In Texas, to be under the influence of Rohypnol is "to get roached."

Uses of Rohypnol

Rohypnol is manufactured as small, white tablets with "Roche" inscribed on one side with an encircled "1" or "2" indicating a 1 mg or 2 mg dose. These tablet markings are commonly found on other Roche pharmaceuticals, and a pattern of abusing any drug made by Roche (Valium, Klonopin/Clonopin, Rivotril) has also developed. Rohypnol is usually taken orally, although there are reports that it has been ground up and snorted. Rohypnol is illegal in the United States, and it can draw significant penalties for the possession and sale of the drug.

Effects of Rohypnol

After taking Rohypnol, the user may feel intoxicated, then sleepy - a feeling that may last up to eight hours. Users under the influence may exhibit slurred speech, impaired judgment, and difficulty walking. Rohypnol can cause deep sedation, respiratory distress, blackouts that can last up to 24 hours, and amnesia where users forget events experienced while under the influence. In some cases, the drug has paradoxical effects and causes users to become aggressive. The potential for overdose or death can occur, especially when mixed with other drugs like alcohol.

Slang terms for GHB include Grievous Bodily Harm, Easy Lay, Gook, Gamma 10, Liquid X, Liquid E, Liquid G, Georgia Home Boy, Soap, Scoop, Salty Water, Somatomax, G-riffick, Cherry Meth, Fantasy, Organic Quaalude, Nature’s Quaalude, and Zonked.

Uses

GHB is consumed orally in capsule form or as a grainy, white to sandy-colored powder. Powdered GHB is often dissolved in liquids like water or alcoholic beverages and then consumed. However, it is most frequently sold as a slightly salty, clear liquid in small bottles where users pay by the capful or by the teaspoon. Most GHB is created in clandestine laboratories where purity and quality cannot be guaranteed. Often substituted for Ecstasy, another club drug, a capful may cost the user $3 to $5 per dose. GHB is also used as a sedative to come down off stimulants like ephedrine, Ecstasy, speed, or cocaine.

Effects

GHB produces intoxication followed by deep sedation. Once ingested, the drug will begin to take effect in 15 minutes to an hour, lasting one to three hours. GHB can cause nausea, vomiting, delusions, depression, vertigo, visual disturbances, seizures, respiratory distress, loss of consciousness, amnesia, and coma. When combined with alcohol and other drugs, the potential for deadly overdoses escalates rapidly. Numerous overdoses in Texas and nationwide have required emergency room treatment and mechanical assistance to breathe.                                                                                                       

     


                                                                                                   

























































Copyright © 2004 [Toxicology Associates, Inc.]. All rights reserved.
Revised: January 12, 2015